OUR HISTORY

This is our history

The Borquez family represents the fourth generation of farmers in a family tree that is deeply rooted in Southern Sonora and the Yaqui Valley. While Baldomero “Melo” Almada ventured into becoming the first Mexican to ever play in the Major Leagues of Baseball when he started for the Boston Red Sox in 1933, Gustavo Borquez pioneered what today is the 250,000Hectare-Yaqui Valley alongside other brave individuals. Even though their professions were nothing alike, both brought back home the same moral code of Humbleness, Honesty and a strong sense of service to their Community.  

Pablo Borquez Sr., son of Gustavo, married Melo’s daughter Lydia. They took his father’s teachings and fields to create one of Mexico’s largest Wheat and Corn producing operations before the Land Reform of 1976 forced the entire family to abandon their fields and home. Pablo then opted to move north of the state in Caborca where he was able to maintain his family’s farming legacy as he planted one of the very first vineyards in Mexico for raisins and table grapes.  

Meanwhile, Pablo II was studying Viticulture in Fresno State preparing to bring back innovative knowledge into the family’s business.  His professional agenda was determined to honor the works and teachings of his ancestors. Along with his wife, Martha, he expanded the business back into the Yaqui Valley as they bought back his old home and fields 29 years 1 day after the violent expropriation. Pablo II became the first to ever produce Asparagus and Table Grapes in the Yaqui Valley. Two products with high labor demands and transcendent economic multiplier effects.  

Additionally, his daughter Ana Lourdes, leads the family’s foundation, which supports thousands of kids and adults in Caborca and Yaqui valleys’ rural villages. His sons Pablo, Sergio and Alvaro work their way up the family’s agribusiness. This with the purpose of maintaining their grate-grandparents’ moral code of Humbleness, Honesty and service to their Communities.

Fisrt grape harvest in the Yaqui Valley.



Three Generations.



Share your own story with us.